Locust Point
southeast-baltimore

On your way to Fort McHenry National Monument, you'll pass through historic Locust Point, a charming, peninsular neighborhood full of families and friendly neighbors.

Locust Point

O, Say Can You See!

Whether you're an armchair historian or are curious to see where “The Star-Spangled Banner” was written, Fort McHenry is a must-see historical site when visiting Baltimore. Baltimore is big on the American flag. Francis Scott Key was inspired to pen our national anthem when he watched the stars and stripes flying over Fort McHenry while bombs were bursting in the air during the War of 1812. The fort, the only area of the National Park System to be designated both a National Monument and Historic Shrine, has deep military significance. During the Civil War, it served as a military prison, and then during the War of 1812, the fort defended the Baltimore harbor and stopped a British advance into the city. Today, the site is open to the public year-round and offers visitor programs and specials events, like ranger-led “flag talks” and morning and evening flag changes.

The Sweetest Sign

Glowing red on the city skyline each night is the “Domino Sugars” sign, which has become a Baltimore icon. The neon sign, 120 feet by 70 feet, was erected in 1951 and become a beloved city landmark. The sign is emblematic of the almost 100-year-old Domino Sugar Refinery, which processes 7 million pounds of sugar A DAY. Because of the Domino plant, the port of Baltimore is the nation’s leading seaport for imported and domestic raw cane sugar. While the factory is not open to the public, the sign is one of the most popular backgrounds from an authentic Baltimore photo opp.

Did You Know?

When a new flag is designed for use by the United States, it is first flown over Fort McHenry.

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