Pigtown/Washington Village
southwest-baltimore

Pigtown's Mainstreet is becoming more and more active for residents and businesses as this neighborhood with roots as a community for railroad workers continues to grow.

Pigtown/Washington Village

Railroad History

Baltimore is where the nation’s first railroad tracks were laid, and much of that locomotive history can still be experienced in two railroad museums. You can even ride a train along the first mile and a half stretch of track laid in America at The Baltimore and Ohio (B&O) Railroad Museum, which also has the oldest collection of rolling stock in America – from locomotives to old freight cars to passenger cars. One block north of the B&O Railroad Museum, you can learn about those who built the railroad at the Irish Railroad Workers Museum, also known as the Irish Shrine, which is established in a few old row houses where the workers once lived. One section shows what the workers’ homes would have looked like, another shows the workers socialized and how they worshiped.

A Walk in the Park

Carroll Park is Baltimore's third oldest city park and was originally part of the vast Mount Clare estate owned by Charles Carroll, a Barrister in the mid-18th century. The estate home was preserved and turned into Mount Clare Museum House, one of the oldest and finest examples of colonial Georgian architecture in the city, open to the public. Today, Carroll Park boasts an assortment of athletic field, a neighborhood playground, a natural play space, skateboard park, as well as a nine-hole golf course.

This Little Piggy Went to the Market

The historic neighborhood’s Main Street offers an eclectic mix of boutique shops and restaurants. Pick up unique clothing and accessories at Ripp’d Canvas, 9/10 Shoes and 2 Chic Boutique, then dine at one of the local eateries—good bets are old-time neighborhood market Culinary Architecture Market & Kitchen and Cheat Day Bar and Grill (try the lobster mac and cheese or the lamb cheese steak). The thriving main street is also the epicenter for the popular annual Pigtown Festival and the running of the pigs, known as the Squeakness.

Did You Know

Pigtown was named in the late 1800s, when cargo railcars from the Midwest would let carloads of pigs out, which created a spectacle as they were herded through Ostend and Cross Streets to South Baltimore.

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