Station North Arts & Entertainment District
northeast-baltimore

Just north of Penn Station is colorful Station North. Known for its plethora of artists and murals, it is Baltimore's first designated state arts and entertainment district.

Station North Arts & Entertainment District

Taking Art to the Streets

Station North is the place to see murals, thanks to innovative street art projects. Open Walls Baltimore are outdoor exhibitions of 38 murals and installations created by street artists from around the world and curated by international street art leader and Baltimore artist Gaia, whose tiger mural welcomes you on Maryland Avenue. His art is also found on a mural opposite R. House in Remington and hanging in the gorgeous new Sagamore Pendry boutique hotel in Fell's Point. In addition to the commissioned murals is Graffiti Alley, the only place in Baltimore where graffiti art is legal. The T-shaped alley behind Motor House is a constantly changing open-air canvas, which is also a very popular photo shoot location.

It’s Show Time

Station North has multiple performance spaces, where you can see everything from comedy and rap battles to independent film and burlesque. The top places to catch shows and other art and music events are The Motor House, Windup Space and the Parkway Theatre. Starting out decades ago as the first Ford dealership in Maryland, The Motor House and front bar Show Room offer programming almost every day of the week. Windup Space is a multi-use arts space and bar that hosts events nightly ranging from “drink and draw” nights to the monthly free dance party, 4 Hours of Funk. The newest renovated kid on the block is the Stavros Niarchos Foundation Parkway Theatre, a beautifully restored movie house showing independent films daily and home to the annual Maryland Film Festival.

Streetcar History

One of the city’s quasi-hidden treasures is the Baltimore Streetcar Museum, which offers one of the most comprehensive histories of an American city’s transportation past with its permanent collection of street railway vehicles and artifacts. Open every Sunday 10 months of the year (The museum is closed for restoration work in January and February) and Saturdays from June through October, visitors can enjoy streetcar rides down its Falls Road track and see exhibits, displaces and archive materials. The vintage fleet of street cars and other rail transit history includes a streetcars built between the years 1859 and 1963.

Did You Know?

At The Motor House are art studios of some of Baltimore’s most luminary artists, including MacArthur “Genius” Grant-winning Joyce Scott and Amy Sherald, who painted the portrait of Michele Obama hanging in the National Portrait Gallery.

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