Waverly
northeast-baltimore

This quaint historic district is home to a thriving arts community and landmarks of Baltimore’s storied sports past.

Waverly

Historical Landmarks and Figures

When Waverly was first established in the early 1840s, it was called Huntingdon after the community’s oldest church, the Huntingdon St. John Episcopal Church. The name change was inspired by Sir Walter Scott’s first novel, Waverly. The neighborhood is also known as the birthplace of American poet Lizette Woodworth Reese, who is buried in the cemetery behind the church.

A Love for the Game

Waverly was once the site of Memorial Stadium, former home of the Baltimore Colts, and legendary quarterback Johnny Unitas, and the Baltimore Orioles. It’s where the Baltimore Orioles won their first World Series in 1966, defeating the favorited Los Angeles Dodgers, and where the Baltimore Ravens made their debut in 1996. The stadium was demolished in 2001, but today on the site of the original field, there is a baseball diamond used by the YMCA. And the surrounding area is still a bustling shopping destination centered along 33rd Street and Greenmount Avenue.

A Caring Community

Waverly has embraced its community-focused way of life with the 32nd Street Farmers Market, a nonprofit organization open every Saturday from 7 a.m. to 12 p.m. that offers visitors an array of fresh produce, baked goods, flowers and more. Waverly is also cultivating its arts scene through 901 Arts, a community-based youth arts center that hosts an annual arts festival called WAVEscape every summer in the Montpelier and 30th Street Park.

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