Little Italy
southeast-baltimore

Little Italy is a small but mighty community full of families that have lived there for generations, many of which own the plethora of delicious restaurants on every block.

Little Italy

Mangia Bene

Stroll through the charming streets of Little Italy, and you’ll come across dozens of dining options. With a range of casual to fine-dining options, this neighborhood is a go-to for any occasion. Some favorites are Germano’s Piattini, which also has an active cabaret line-up; Da Mimmo’s, serving generous portions at affordable prices; and Café Gia, which you’ll find by its colorful mural and balcony. Fine dining hot spots include Aldo’s Ristorante and La Tavola. Family-owned favorites Ciao Bella and Sabatino's have been around for generations.

Festivals Galore

It seems like every weekend there’s a festival in this downtown neighborhood, where the community and visitors take advantage of closed off streets to mix and mingle while enjoying traditional Italian foods like cannoli and Italian ice. Some of the top festivals are the weekend-long Feast of St. Gabriele and the Feast of St. Anthony. During the Madonnari Arts Festival each fall, the streets come alive with color and beauty when more than 50 visual artists paint the streets and create gorgeous chalk masterpieces, often depicting religious images.

Play (Bocce) Ball

Restaurants are used to people buying bottles of wine and taking them to go to quench their thirst while playing the traditional Italian sport of bocce ball. The Little Italy bocce ball leagues are some of the most competitive to get into each year, with play between May and September. The courts, which are open to the public, are popular hang-outs during the warmer months, with green-white-and-red painted benches for spectators. For year-round bocce games head to La Scala where you'll find bocce courts in the restaurant.

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