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Baltimore’s Most Instagrammable Places

Looking for the best spot to grab a shot for the 'gram? Look no further.

There’s a reason why visual artists and photographers love Baltimore. From the ornate architecture and expressive street art to the picturesque landscapes of our green spaces, we’ve got the best backdrops you can ask for.

Mother and daughter in front of the Cosmic Egg at the American Visionary Art Museum.

The sparkling mosaic “Cosmic Galaxy Egg” by Andrew Logan at the American Visionary Art Museum lends itself to a great photo opp.

American Visionary Art Museum

One of Baltimore’s most popular art destinations is the American Visionary Art Museum, which celebrates the work of self-taught artists, and is brimming with photo opps. Some of the top shots are of the larger-than-life statue of drag legend Divine, pink poodle Fifi and the sparkling mirrored external wall.

 

Baltimore Love Project Murals

You can literally see “love” all over the city, spelled out on the side of buildings as murals by Michael Owen. This local artist has painted 20 murals of silhouetted hands spelling “L-O-V-E” in neighborhoods from Mount Washington to Carroll Park. Favorite spots include the mural across from the historic Senator Theatre in Belvedere Square and one on The Avenue in Hampden.

 

The Domino Sugars sign at night from Federal Hill.

The Domino Sugars factory is in Baltimore’s Locust Point neighborhood.

Domino Sugars Sign

The iconic neon sign of the Domino Sugars factory has long been a fixture of the Baltimore skyline. The best places to get shots of it are from Locust Point, Harbor East, Fell’s Point and Canton along the water. The Domino Sugar factory has been in continual operation since 1922 and produces more than 6.6 million pounds of sugar every day.

 

Federal Hill Park

Federal Hill offers one of the most picturesque Inner Harbor views, and has long been a Baltimore landmark. It was a defensive stronghold during the War of 1812 because of its panoramic view of the city. Today, that view makes it ideal for IG-worthy pics.

 

A woman shooting an image at Graffiti Alley in Station North.

Graffiti Alley in Station North is the perfect spot for a photo shoot.

Graffiti Alley

Tucked behind Motor House, a performance venue, Graffiti Alley is the only space in the city where street artists can legally create their work. It’s an ever-changing gallery that’s ideal for capturing the city’s colorful vibe.

 

Howard Peter Rawlings Conservatory & Botanic Gardens

Built in 1888, the Rawlings Conservatory features five greenhouse rooms and a half-acre garden. Capture pictures of exotic flora in the Victorian glass and iron greenhouse, feed the koi at the indoor pond or wander outside to take pictures in its exterior gardens in Druid Hill Park.

 

Orioles night game at Oriole Park at Camden Yards.

Catch a baseball game at Oriole Park at Camden Yards downtown.

Oriole Park at Camden Yards

Consistently named the most beautiful ballpark in America, Oriole Park at Camden Yards is the home of the Baltimore’s Major League Baseball team, the Orioles. The park is picture-perfect, especially against the backdrop of the historic B&O Warehouse along Eutaw Street.

 

Patterson Park Pagoda

The Patterson Park Pagoda is a must-stop photo op, not only for the views from atop a hill in Patterson Park, but also for its oriental-style iron, wood and glass exterior. Constructed in the 1890s, the four-story building continues to serve its original purpose as an observation tower. It’s best accessed via the entrance to the park at East Lombard Street and South Patterson Park Avenue.

 

The George Peabody Library in Mount Vernon.

The George Peabody Library has been standing in Mount Vernon since 1878.

The George Peabody Library

As the inspiration for the library in the Disney film “Beauty and the Beast,” the George Peabody Library is considered one of the most beautiful libraries in the world by the likes of Architectural Digest. This iconic, 19th-century space holds more than 300,000 books and features five tiers of ornamental cast-iron balconies as well as a magnificent skylight.

 

Washington Monument

Constructed shortly after the Battle of Baltimore during the War of 1812, the 178-foot-tall monument was designed by Robert Mills, who went on to design the Washington Monument on the National Mall in D.C. While the Washington Monument looks pretty from any of the four grassy squares surrounding it—especially during the spring when the cherry blossoms bloom—you can get also amazing views of the city by climbing to the top.